Posted February 07, 2019 06:06:14Children can be convicted of child support violations and sentenced to up to 20 years in prison, according to a new state law that takes effect in 2019.

Under the new law, children can be ordered to pay child support payments of up to $10,000 per month to their fathers, mothers, guardians or legal representatives and up to an additional $10 for each child who is under the age of 17.

Child support payments can also be made to the same father, mother, guardian or legal representative.

The new law also requires courts to set aside a portion of the child support orders for a person to pay the father, guardian, legal representative or another person for the support owed to the person.

The law does not address whether parents who are divorced can be considered the same as one parent in child support matters.

The measure comes on the heels of a state Supreme Court ruling in 2016 that found Arkansas was violating a person’s constitutional right to equal protection under the law.

The court held that Arkansas was using a discriminatory method to calculate child support.

In a separate ruling in 2018, the state’s highest court ruled that Arkansas’ parental child support statute was unconstitutional.

The court in 2016 also found that the state was violating the Constitution’s equal protection clause by denying a person the right to an attorney who was not a public defender.

The U.S. Supreme Court in 2016 struck down a part of Arkansas’ “mother-child” law that mandated the state to provide support for children of divorced parents, including parents who were in jail or on probation.

The case involved a mother who was behind bars and the state denied her an attorney to represent her in court.

The law was struck down in January 2019.